Heckles

Also, just because you’re not kissing anyone in the near future doesn’t mean you can ignore your bad breath. When you speak up in class, it shouldn’t feel like an act of chemical warfare to those around you.

Next time you’re driving, can you at least take it easy on us cyclists? All we want is to share the road in peace.

I can’t help but shake my head at the hundreds of people who waited in the sweltering heat outside of St. Mary’s Hospital to catch a first glance at a prince who will never be able to levy a tax, form a government, or declare a state of war.

Our online culture currently supports pro anorexic and bulimic behaviour—called pro-ana and pro-mia sites—and thin inspiration websites. Our society’s obsession with people’s outward appearance is harmful to our own well-being. Whatever happened to just eating right and exercising? Whatever happened to caring more about who people are on the inside than what they look like? There’s a reason eating disorders are on the rise among young people, and a lot has to do with our fat-shaming culture.

I send out the following message to those grumpy people who seem to feel entitled to complain endlessly about this bout of nasty weather: Please stop. We are all travelling on the bus with you; we all have chunks of snow dripping into our socks; if you look closely, you will see that our eyelashes are just as frozen as yours. Snow, like death, unites all people.

If you’re not going to show up at group meetings or you intend on doing only the bare minimum, I can deal with that. But showing your face on the day our project is handed back and treating me like your best buddy is just a slap in the face.

I slump lower in my seat and avoid eye contact. Shrinking my body, I lower my gaze to the scribbled notes in front of me, trying to look extremely preoccupied by what I have just written. My feigned attempts are hopeless: out of the 300-something students in the room, the prof is staring at me.

More widespread and contagious than any virus since the plague, this epidemic spreads not through contact, but by words. This danger is the overuse of the word “literally.”

If I had the capability to make it so that food was always the lowest price and the highest quality, I would gladly oblige; but such a feat is beyond my capabilities. Yet no matter how many times I try to explain this, I still end up with a disgruntled customer waving a hunk of meat in my face.

From roommates to classmates to my own mother, the vast majority of people I told about my vegan aspirations reacted with nothing but negativity.

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