Technology

In a world where the traditional act of dating is becoming dated, Catherine Ballachey and Stephanie Henderson are bringing Listen To Me, a dynamic and nontraditional play, to Ottawa’s theatre scene. Listen To Me allows audience members to interact with performers in a “speed dating” setting where delving deeper than smalltalk, without the distraction of technology, is the ultimate goal.

The following is the game’s description: “This unfortunate girl has so much extra weight that no diet can help her. In our clinic she can go through a surgery called liposuction that will make her slim and beautiful. We’ll need to make small cuts on problem areas and suck out the extra fat. Will you operate her, doctor?”

Are you kidding me?

Due to its long and complex history, English seems to have developed a resilience and flexibility that has allowed it to emerge as the most universal language in the world. Its presence on the global stage makes it particularly susceptible to new words and formulations, but this trait also makes it more adaptable and likely to remain a linguistic power.

Instead of coming home and immediately checking Facebook, an aspiring writer could be finishing the rough draft of his or her future bestseller. Rather than wasting the night away on Twitter, that young person who wants to be prime minister could be reading up on world issues.

There is something truly wonderful about enjoying the rain instead of worrying about whether or not my assorted electronics will get ruined. I also feel a sense of freedom when I go exploring and see things through two original lenses—my eyes—instead of an Instagram filter.

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