Arts

Premieres Sept. 27

 

Don Jon tastefully covers the issue of porn addiction. The movie has a great plot with pristine symbolism and camera work. The script was a little dry, as is often the case when one of the main actors—in this case Joseph Gordon-Levitt—writes the script.

The ending also seemed abrupt but did convey the point of the movie well. We finally get to see Gordon-Levitt in a different role and he pulls it off with on-point acting. Unfortunately, the same cannot be said about Scarlett Johansson, whose New York accent is less than convincing and whose onscreen chemistry seems forced. Julianne Moore holds her own, perhaps even surpassing Gordon-Levitt’s acting skills. She is convincing in her role as the older, more pragmatic woman.

The great thing about this movie is its untraditional take on things: the young bombshell is not the heroine for once, and the stud actually falls for a realistic woman. Don Jon truly pushes the conventional ideas of pornography and the expectations it sets out for women, challenging these views and making the connection between one human being with another the highest form of pleasure.