Features

Photo: Marta Kierkus.

When you’re a Canadian citizen traveling the globe, here are a couple facts to keep in mind when it comes to your traveling privileges.

  • There are several countries where Canadians can visit visa-free. At the top of the list is the United States, where Canadians can stay for up to six months without a visa. There are a number of other countries Canadians can visit for a limited amount of time (usually one to three months) without a visa. These countries are spread across multiple continents, ranging from Japan to Botswana to Chile.
  • The Canadian passport has been ranked the sixth most flexible on the planet, with the German passport ranking the highest, and with Sweden claiming second place.
  • It’s usually a good idea to take note of the federal government’s travel advisories, which provide important information on the state of other countries—such as security measures and health warnings. There are currently 13 countries listed as “avoid all travel”, such as Syria, North Korea, and Somalia. Some of these travel advisories contain interesting warnings. For instance, the government warns Canadians about American gun ownership rates, jaywalking in the Czech Republic, and the “chronic lack of parking spaces” in the Netherlands.
  • Since Canadians are also citizens of the British Commonwealth, we have certain additional rights under British nationality law. For example, if you have a grandparent who was born in the United Kingdom you could be admitted for up to five years on that basis. This should come in handy if you end up visiting the U.K., and end up not wanting to leave anytime soon.
  • While English is one of the most commonly spoken languages in the world, it’s always helpful to know a couple of words in the native language of the country you’re visiting. But if you’re really lost and are in need of help, you should know that the youth of foreign nations (someone under the age of 30) are much more proficient in English than older members of the population.