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photo by Mico Mazza

The Fulcrum: Why are you running?

Mulet: I think we need to build consensus in this university. There was this moment that came when I realized that all the student bodies are defederating … I’m in engineering, so I like fixing problems.

What are some of the goals you hope to accomplish if you win?

It’s all about the student experience, in my opinion. I’d like to bring the federation back to the glory they had by making the students really feel represented. Part of my goals would be to review different things of how the SFUO is run, and try to change it.

Back in the day, the BOA [Board of Administration] was formed by the executives of all the federated bodies, so I really want to include them into the day-to-day decision-making process of the student federation. I would get a committee together to look at ways we could change the constitution [to make that happen].

Part of my platform is I’m reaching out to students, I’m sending emails to the community at large to figure out what they want and find out what works.

Do you have any on-campus experience related to your position?

Since I started school, I’ve been trying to help on campus. In my first year, I was a faculty mentor. I worked for the administration for eight months as an academic assistant. That helped me understand how the administration works.

I’m also a resident community advisor, which helps me understand what student life—mostly for first years—is like. You’re not necessarily loved all the time, because you’re being paid to enforce the rules.

Being a president requires a clear understanding of the inner workings of the university. How will you gain this knowledge to help bridge the gap between the students, the administration, and the federation?

It’s about a lot of reading, and a lot of asking around. I do have a clear understanding of how the university works. It’s really up to the students to find out what’s up, but students don’t necessarily do that, so we need to make our system of communication simple so that it works.

For first-year students, during 101 Week when [the volunteers] give them their packages, I would make out lists of tips to show them what deadlines are, what dropping out really means before it appears on your transcripts.

Leadership and strong decision-making skills are definitely necessary for this position. How will you go about proving to students you are a strong leader and you possess the necessary traits?

Leaders aren’t born—they’re made. My goal is to run with it. I’ve acquired skills reaching out to students—I am reaching out to them, because the more information we get, the merrier we’ll be. I am trying to reach out right now, so I can lead them in this change we all need.

I don’t have anything to hide—once the campaigning really starts, I’m going to make my Facebook public to everyone, and I have a blog that I’ll be updating. People will see I’m not bullshitting around—I’m writing about what I want to do, and how I see it.

Give us a quote to remember you by.

“All we are saying is give peace a chance.” —The Beatles

Who are your favourite fictional hero and villain and why?

Atomic Ant. It’s a tiny little ant, but she’s powerful—she has all the force in the world. Being little can bring big change.

Villains… Why would he be my favourite? I’m going to say … how can a bad person be good? Riddler from Batman. He’s never direct—you can always interpret him in your own ways.

photo by Mico Mazza

Ethan Plato

The Fulcrum: Why are you running?

Plato: I am running for president because I think that there’s a decent amount of people who feel alienated from the student federation at the University of Ottawa.

I’d really like to get back to ensuring that we continue to build on the work of creating an accessible campus, but also making sure it’s inclusive for all the different groups on and off campus so that they may feel part of the [U of O] community. My biggest thing is that I feel that, as president, I should be somewhat of a mediator, as well as a manager, for the team that works toward that end.

What are some of the goals you hope to accomplish if you win?

I’d like to really focus on revamping the professor evaluation program. Bubble sheets really aren’t enough. Profs alter their teaching style for that … just so that they get good marks.

I also want to work on some very creative and interesting social events. We’re thinking about trying to lobby to, once a month, get the noise bylaws pushed back to 1 a.m., for example, so that you could have a concert in Strathcona Park or bonfire hockey in the outdoor rink of the community centre [Sandy Hill Community Health Centre]. We will work together with the community of Sandy Hill, and we would have it so that these nights are going to be louder, so it’s not just a random time.

Do you have any on-campus experience related to your position?

I have sat on the School of International Development assembly for every year that I have been here. I was a student representative for development students, and I was vp academic affairs for international development my second and part of my third year, and I am currently the fourth-year representative for PIDSSA[Political, International, and Development Studies Student Association].

In that capacity, I worked with various services and clubs.  I was also a member of the University of Ottawa sailing team, which is a club, so that was an interesting experience—seeing things from that end as well.

Being a president requires a clear understanding of the inner workings of the university. How will you gain this knowledge to help bridge the gap between the students, the administration, and the federation?

A big thing that I think I bring to the table is that I am someone who has the experience working with the administration … I know how that works, as a member of the federated body. I also have an understanding of the workings of the federation.

Honestly, I think the biggest thing for bridging the gap would be communication, and assuring that things are open. As president, it’s hard, because there’s not a big mandate—it’s more assuring that everyone else is doing their job. And so it would be making sure that my team is working well, and following up if there are any complaints or positive feedback, from either of them. Basically, going in there with an open mind and positive demeanor, and being friendly with people.

Leadership and strong decision-making skills are necessary for this position. How will you go about proving to students that you are a strong leader and that you possess the necessary traits to be their president?

I think the biggest thing is to lead by example. I am not someone who’s in your face yelling at you about things, but I will get the job done. I am someone who is reliable and—I’d like to think—intelligent.

I think I work well with people, and I try not to make enemies with people. Maybe that’s not good if I want be a politician, but I’ve lived my life that way so far, and so I hope to continue to do that.

Give us a quote to remember you by.

Communication is key.

Who are your favorite fictional hero and villain and why?

My favourite hero is Batman. He has been my favourite hero for a long time. My brother’s first words were “Na na na na na na Batman,” so that just shows the influence [I] had on [my brother]. I like him because he doesn’t have any superpowers—he’s just a boss, and he does it on his own.

I don’t want to stick with Batman, but the Joker was just amazing. [I like] the Joker just because he is so well done, and chilling, and I think it was especially kind of terrifying the way that he thinks that society is bad and tries to bring out the worst in everyone.

 

photo by Mico Mazza

Amalia Savva

The Fulcrum: Why are you running?

Savva: I’m running because I feel that the past year was a great opportunity for me to start a lot of projects and to start good building around the student federation. I’d love to continue the work next year.

What are some of the goals you hope to accomplish if you win?

I feel like a lot of it is going to be continuing the work I’ve been doing over the past year. This year I’ve done a lot of outreach to students and a lot of communication with students, [like] through the campus-wide survey that we did this year. Continuing that work, taking those results, and putting them into action for next year [is one of my goals].

I think [it’s about] not only communicating to the students, but communicating with the administration, whether that’s through Food Services, within the University Centre, or the advertising policy on campus.

Do you have any on-campus experience related to your position?

I have been involved on campus for four years, starting with my involvement with the Political, International, and Development Studies Student Association (PIDSSA). I held two positions on the executive, including president. I worked as Promotions Coordinator for the SFUO, then as Campaigns Organizer. For the past year, I have held the position of president of the Student Federation of the University of Ottawa.

Being a president requires a clear understanding of the inner workings of the university. How will you gain this knowledge to help bridge the gap between the students, the administration, and the federation?

This university is pretty giant. We have around 40,000 students, including graduate students, at this university. In terms of the services and the administration, I’m still learning how everything works.

In terms of bridging the gap, I think it’s all about communication. That’s what I’ve been doing last year and that’s what I want to continue doing—outreaching to students, gaining feedback, and bringing it back to the administration.

Some concrete things I want see happening around is actually talking to students one-on-one. I think that’s the most efficient way to find out what the students are feeling. As president, I sit on various committees within the university, so that’s where I can put the knowledge of what students have been telling me into practice.

Leadership and strong decision-making skills are definitely necessary for this position. How will you go about proving to students that you are a strong leader and that you possess the necessary traits to be president?

I feel like this year I’ve proven that a lot, [like] through the campus-wide survey. Being a leader is about having that open form of communication with our students and, again, talking to students.

I don’t think being a leader is being in the office all day. Being a leader is about talking to students and making sure not only that we hear what they have to say, but returning on what the federation is offering.

When it comes to within the SFUO, teamwork in there is extremely important, especially with the executive. I think being a leader in that case is providing the rest of the executive with the help they may need throughout their mandate.

Give us a quote to remember you by.

It’s my role to ensure the student federation listens to student voices and advocates for student rights—and that’s what I’m all about, and that’s what I’d like to see for next year.

Who are your favourite fictional hero and villain and why?

My favourite hero would be Martha Washington … She’s definitely a strong, very powerful woman. My favourite villain would be Johnny the Homicidal Maniac. He’s a very strange, very intricate person.