Arts

Marc Charron makes second lunchtime appearance at U of O

Photo: Jen File (Courtesy of Marc Charron)

Marc Charron says he always knew deep down that being a musician was what he wanted to do because it was “the only thing that was always there waiting for me when everything fell apart.”

After 16 years trying to make it as a singer-songwriter, the Ottawa native feels like things are starting to pay off. Amidst all the one-hit wonders he’s seen come and go, and all the buzz bands that burn out before his eyes, Charron says he’s proud of how far he’s come.

“I’ve been at it at a long time. My professional career is over twice as long as The Beatles’ career,” he said.

“I used to book gigs with phone calls more or less,” he said. “I’d say I’ve also become more realistic about what I do. Really, I’ve been sharpening my teeth and know I’m close to something big.”

Charron took the stage in the Jock-Turcot University Centre for a lunchtime performance on Nov. 26. It was the folk-rocker’s second time playing at the University of Ottawa.

“It was a quick hour,” he said. “Sometimes you get swept away in performance … anything, a thought. And before you know it, you’ve been on stage for an hour. Where did the time go?”

He said playing in front a large number of students coming and going through the university’s main hub was no different than other gigs, despite the unique setting. “I just played as best as I can (and) hope it translates. That is what I am realizing more and more.”

Much of the crowd took a liking to Charron’s roots-infused folk-rock tunes, as numerous students stuck around after the show to ask him about his music. He said he’s been inspired by the likes of Wilco, The Black Keys, and Ben Harper, to name a few.

Charron spends most of his time as a soloist, but he also plays in a duo called The Jaymarcs, who played at the latest Nature Nocturne event at the Canadian Museum of Nature on Nov. 28.

He said his next big project is recording The Jaymarcs and working on his new home.

“I’m a first-time homeowner and a full-time independent musician. Seemed almost impossible when I was starting out,” he said. “Lots of great things have happened and continue to happen.”