Editorial

Photo: CC, Jessica and Lon Binder.

Eating fine on the roadside

One of the best dining experiences I’ve ever had was a meal that I ate on the side of the road. My best friend and I were in Morocco, travelling from Ourika to Marrakech, when we spotted a family-run restaurant on the side of the mountainous road. When I say restaurant, I really mean tables and chairs precariously perched on a rocky landing beside a stream of rapids, surrounded by mountains and lush greenery. The scenery was breathtaking and unforgettable, but the food was just as good if not better. This encounter proves, if anything, that you don’t need to eat at an expensive, candlelit restaurant with fancy tablecloths to have a memorable culinary experience.

—Savannah Awde, Editor-in-Chief.

Suicide sauce taste test

If you ever find yourself participating in a spicy chicken wing eating contest in the future, heed these words: wash your damn hands when you’re done. After cheering on my co-worker through a basket of wings drenched in suicide sauce, I decided to dip my fingers in and taste it for myself out of morbid curiosity. Not only did it feel like my tongue was going to burn off, but I also made the near fatal mistake of rubbing my eye with the same fingers. Needless to say, it felt like someone flicked battery acid in my eyeball and I’ve stayed far away from super spicy food ever since.

—Kyle Darbyson, Managing Editor.

Love at first lobster

For every anniversary, birthday, get together, or random seafood craving, Red Lobster has been a great place to visit since I was a child. Back then, my go-to meal was spaghetti—to my parents’ chagrin. My favourite meal now is lobster on mashed potatoes with a creamy white wine sauce and freshly baked biscuits. This ultimate feast is a classic choice for a bit of everything, but scallops and mussels are delicious too! Even their caesar salad is delicious with shaved parmesan cheese, as well as a scrumptious lobster bisque. No matter what event I am going to Red Lobster for the food is definitely memorable.

—Alexa-Eliza Carter, Features Editor.

Building up an Alp-etite

This past summer a group of friends and I were in Switzerland for a school trip. One morning we woke up at 5 a.m. to take a train into the Alps to do some sightseeing, but by lunchtime we were starving and had limited options available for food. We were exhausted, it was pouring rain, and we had no idea where we were. It was then that we came upon a tiny restaurant in the local village, and I ordered a pesto pasta dish, which to this day is definitely the best pasta I have ever eaten. It was simple yet full of flavour, and I still dream about it sometimes. I would definitely make a trip back just to eat it one more time.

—Graham Robertson, News Editor.

Best Italian in Boston’s oldest neighborhood

Boston’s North End has been around since the mid-1600s. Since then, it has transformed into one of the most beautiful and bustling historically Italian neighbourhoods in North America. Being of both Italian and Bostonian decent, my mom and I sniffed out a cozy restaurant named Panza on Hanover Street. The food was authentic, fresh, and absolutely delicious. I will argue that it’s the best Italian food anywhere west of the motherland. Having visited the restaurant twice, four years apart, the friendly little bistro is an absolute must if you find yourself in one of America’s best cities.

—Spencer Murdock, Sports Editor.

Thanksgiving feasts

Maybe I’m biased due to the timing here, but there’s no better food-related memory in my mind than Thanksgiving dinner—and all the leftovers of course. For some reason, pre-made stuffing that you can buy all year at the grocery store becomes the best food on earth for a day. Large helpings of turkey, potatoes, and everything else to the point where food can barely stay on my plate is an ideal scenario for me. As much as I love exotic food in new places, heaps of stuffing, gravy, and cranberry sauce at home with friends and family is the real winner in my books.

—Eric Davidson, Opinions Editor.