Little known fact, this is probably the favourite drink of Canadian electronic musician, Peaches (Merill Nisker).

The Nisker

1 ½ oz Vodka

¾ oz Apricot or Peach Schnapps

¼  oz Simple Syrup

½ oz Lemon Juice

Mix ingredients over ice in a cocktail mixer. Shake for 15 seconds. Pour into an old-fashioned glass over ice.

What’s in the drink?

Vodka – Whatever you do, don’t buy Smirnoff. My go-to is Tag NO.5 ($26.35 for 750 mL). It’s made in Oakville, Ontario and lacks the rubbing alcohol taste and smell that is synonymous with cheap vodka, but without the expensive price tag of some other top-shelf brands.

Apricot or Peach Schnapps – I used Pecsétes Barack Apricot Liquor ($31.10 for 750 mL, 43%), a Hungarian liqueur that is considerably stronger and less sweet than most schnapps available. If you’re on a budget, turn to Dr. McGillicuddy Peach schnapps ($11.95 for 350 mL, 21%). But beware, not all schnapps are created equal! Dr. McGillicuddy, McGuiness and Bols are all are thick and full of sugar, which often lead to horrible hangovers.

Pro tip: If you’re feeling adventurous, check out the Vintages section of the LCBO on Rideau Street for international and non-traditional spirits. That’s where I found the Pecsétes Barack Apricot Liquor.

Simple Syrup – This is a staple for anyone who wants to have a home bar. Mix equal parts water and sugar in a pot and stir on low heat until all the sugar has dissolved. Keep it in the fridge and it’ll last for roughly four months.

Lemon Juice – As always, it’s best to use fresh ingredients. I guarantee you will be able to taste the difference between real lemon and the fake stuff, which is loaded with sugar. I buy mine pre-squeezed at Market Organics (126 York St) which sells 100 per cent bottled fresh lemon juice at around $7 for a 1L bottle. And if you want the freshest juice possible, buy a lemon and squeeze it yourself, either with your hands or a citrus juicer.