Letters

WHILE READING THE funnies, you turn the page of the paper and suddenly it hits you: There is a discount on flights to the Caribbean. Even better is the senior’s package; you think, “If only I was 65…” I could imagine a lot of things that I would like to be doing in my sixties, and sailing in the Caribbean with a few bottles of Dos Equis in hand is something that comes to mind. When you get hit with that dazzling Allan Rock smile, you’d hardly know that he was born in the same decade that saw the end of World War II.

If you’ve got a keen eye, you might have the opportunity to spot Al at a Gee-Gees game or chatting up a student. Whether it’s the former or the latter, he is doing so without a brown bottle in hand. Al is far from retired; he is living proof that age is simply a number.

I think it’s time we give the guy a little credit. A walk around campus last year
and it was hard not to notice the posters depicting El Presidente as a bad guy from a cheesy horror flick. Allan Rock does not have laser eyes nor is he the evil wizard from The Lord of the Rings.

From office occupations to dirty looks and interruptions during Senate meetings, Al has dealt with a lot in the last few years. Love him or fear him (I don’t know what there is to fear, I’m 99 per cent sure he doesn’t have laser eyes), he has often acted respectfully toward students. Al has taken the time to listen. Last year, he took the time to meet with the students that had occupied his office. Last week, he took the time to read a letter presented to him from the Just Investment Coalition.

With that said, Al has been busy. At the helm of the university, he has a ton of administrative responsibility while simultaneously contending with student issues, all at the ripe age of 64.

For Al, the Dos Equis will have to wait. However, if I ever pass you on a golf course on a warm Sunday afternoon, I shall tip my hat to you. You will most likely respond with a smile and friendly conversation. You might make a dated reference about some cool “upcoming” bands such as the Doors or the Stones, but that would be OK, because sometimes the simple recognition of a person’s presence goes a long way.

See you on the green.

Nathan Boivin
First-year common law student